edgeio announces support for YouTube, Google Video, Skype and PayPal!

We are announcing support for YouTube, Google Video, Skype and PayPal on edgeio. I have been having great fun playing with my new Sanyo Xacti HD-1 camera. The screen shot below shows an edgeio posting that contains a YouTube video (Google Video works also).

YouTube and edgeio with Skype and PayPal

The real listing is here.

As of today you can come and do this yourself on edgeio. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Make a movie of the item you are selling, or want.
2. Upload it to YouTube or Google Video.
3. Click on “Create Listing” on www.edgeio.com.
4. Past in the code for your YouTube or Google Video.
5. Add code snippets for PayPal or Skype or both.
6. Publish your edgeio listing.

Cool stuff if I say so myself :-).

We will build in more explicit support to pick videos from your YouTube uploads and to pick Skype or PayPal buttons in future versions of edgeio.

Have fun, can’t wait to see the results.

New edgeio features to be launched tonight

Later tonight we will be releasing a new version of the edgeio web site. It has a number of new features that we are really excited about. The new site should go live sometime after midnight Pacific time.

1. The ability to post an item for sale directly onto the edgeio web site. No blog needed. When you do this for the first time you will be asked to choose a login and password. On subsequent visits you will be able to post instantly. This is in effect giving you a listings blog hosted by edgeio. In the future we want to consistently add features to this blog platform. Some we already know about (the ability to skin your blog for example). Others we want to hear from you about. feedback@edgeio.com is the place to send product feature requests.

2. The ability to add posts from your blog to edgeio without tagging your posts in advance. To accomplish this simply put your URL in edgeio’s home page and click “get listings”. We will retrieve all recent posts from your blog and you can select which ones to add to edgeio.

3. Tagclouds for cities and for items. Click on the number of cities on the edgeio home page to see the most popular cities on edgeio. After 2 weeks we have around 1200 cities with listings. This grows by about 300 cities a week. We expect to be at 10,000 cities this year. To see category clouds just click on the “more” at the end of each category list on the home page.

4. Advice for power users about how to automate edgeio listings via their RSS feed. We decribe the “edgeio control language” or ECL. This is a means of using tags to tell edgeio a lot about your listing and helps ensure it is listed in the correct cities, and for the correct categories. Over time ECL will evolve into a rich control language for power listers. This is a link from the top of the new edgeio home page.
Rob Hof has written a piece on the new features. We will add more links here as they are published.

Other links:

Read/Write Web

SomeWhat Frank

Mashable

First listings from China

First Chinese Listing on edgeio

The first edgeio listing from China was posted today.

Here is a link to it:

First edgeio listing from China

Original Post

Pretty soon there were several more:


Anima Causa “适形椅”

This is really exciting for us. edgeio was built to provide for bottoms up publishing from every town and city on the earth. To have achieved 12,000 listings in 10 days, and to have listings from 1600 cities feels great. To see Chinese listings is awesome.

I also posted a fuller look at “instant listings” on my personal blog.

edgeio product plans discussed

edgeio has a number of product releases due to happen over the next 2 weeks or so. As we discussed in a couple of places, edgeio was launched with a set of features specifically designed for bloggers who are familiar with tagging, and with ping servers. Some have said (correctly) that this is too narrow an audience for a listings network. We think that the amount of discussion about edgeio has justified our early focus on this audience, but we are almost ready to roll out features for bloggers who are less familiar with the technology, and also for non-bloggers. CrunchNotes points to a podcast where Brian Oberkirck interviews Mike Arrington and they discuss some of these plans. They also discuss spam control. The podcast is here.

Feelings about edgeio expressed…

There’s been quite a discussion about edgeio over the last few days since we launched, with lots of great posts on both sides of the aisle:

The Good:

Jeremy Zawodny writes “I really, really, really believe that few companies have begun to grasp how this new reality changes the landscape they’re used to controlling. I saw Edgeio as one of the first companies to get this.

Jeff Jarvis says “This is just a start but it is a proof of concept of a new world. I’ve been waiting for someone to do this.”

The Bad:

Joe Hunkins thinks edgeio will ultimately fail. “So how can this fail? Easy. People don’t see the small fees at EBAY as a barrier to listing. It’s the technology that is the barrier and unless Edgeio can build a MUCH better than current site that consolidates *existing* listings into a free format I don’t see this lasting more than a year or so. I actually hope I’m wrong, because Mashups like Edgeio are a nice innovative way to restructure the web.”

In a beautifully written piece, Nick Carr says “Edgeio, the much-hyped Web 2.0 tag-sale site, has only been live for a few hours, but it’s already wearing a corpselike look.” He also calls TechCrunch a “Web 2.0 brothel”.

And finally, Techdirt says “The concept is interesting, and it could have some potential over time if a big enough community can be built up and additional services/features are added. However, initially… what problem is it solving?”

The Just Plain Cool:

Dan Farber has a terrific idea: Create a Mashup of Ether and Edgeio. Ether provides the infrastructure to allow people to charge for their phone time, Edgeio provides the promotion. Great idea. “Here’s the mashup: post listings for services delivered over the phone on your blog, Edgeio aggregates them. On blog pages and Edgeio listing pages, Ether’s phone service and pay-per-call time billing service is embedded. More frictionless commerce…”

While we love praise, we also recognize the value in criticism and appreciate the time people are taking to write their thoughts down.

One issue that is brought up a lot is around spam. We’ve created an open system to aggregate edge content and that creates certain…incentives…for people to spam the edgeio service. We think we can control the problem, although we understand it will be a constant battle.

Another issue is whether edgeio will be usable by people who don’t understand RSS, tagging and other blogging-centric protocols. Yes, we agree. We are purposefully reaching out right now to people who do understand what these things are, and will be releasing new tools and products in the next month to help those that don’t want to deal with these protocols to still have a rich interaction with edgeio.

Matt Kaufman, who is Director of Product at edgeio, discusses both issues in detail here.

Where do we go from here?

About a year ago, Keith and Mike introduced me to the idea building a classified listings system around content generated by edge publishers. I had worked with Mike and Keith at RealNames and was intrigued by the idea of giving individuals and businesses the opportunity to list content using their own websites rather than ceding control to a centralized service. So, we began working on edgeio and my job became taking the initial ideas and turning them into concrete plans for a service. Since those initial conversations, we have put a lot of work into building the first release and crafting plans for the future.

In-between chasing down the inevitable bugs following a 1.0 release, I’ve read a lot of great posts about edgeio and it seems that most of them have to do with two key questions.

• How will edgeio handle spam?
• Is edgeio only for bloggers?

Spam is a very real issue that we have been thinking about since day one and our approach to spam is twofold. First, we want to leverage the edgeio community as much as possible to identify posts and publishers that are likely to be spam or otherwise inappropriate. We have seen this work well in other environments and hope we can create the same sense of community in edgeio. To facilitate this, expect to see more in the area of reputation including authentication of publisher’s identity, commenting on publishers and posts, and automated removal of suspect items from anonymous users.

Communities alone, however, cannot stop spam so our second approach to spam is more heavy handed. We intend to leverage filters similar to the Akismet approach, implicit white lists comprised of authenticated edgeio members, and blacklists to handle publishers who continuously abuse the system. We do not claim to have a bullet proof system and there will certainly be issues with spam in our future. We can only promise that we are continuously monitoring the data and doing our best to adapt to the influx of data.

The initial release of edgeio is obviously tailored to publishers who are familiar with the ins and outs of tagging and ping servers. After writing the FAQ, I realize that publishing content is not necessarily for the novice; however, we wanted to give publishers full control over their listings. So, going forward we are committed to extending the concept of using tags and other inline markup to control every facet of how an item is rendered and distributed through the edgeio network. With the exception of claiming your weblog, visiting edgeio will be an option for edge publishers, not a requirement.

At edgeio we do realize, however, that not everyone is familiar with tagging and ping servers. For this reason, in the coming weeks we will introduce tools that allow publishers to add their content to edgeio without anything more than an RSS / ATOM feed from their website. You will have to come to edgeio to make this happen, but we promise the process will be simple and pitfall free.

Sometime later, edgeio will introduce tools for publishers who do not have their own RSS / ATOM enabled website. This way, we will offer a range of solutions meeting the needs of everyone from experienced publishers to people without their own website. It will take some time to get there, but watch for updates on a regular basis. The edgeio team believes in rapid iterations that take into account customer feedback.

If you have comments about the design, missing features, etc. feel free to comment here or contact us at feedback@edgeio.com. As the volume of comments increases, you may find that we direct you back to this blog for more lengthy answers to common questions.