First listings from China

First Chinese Listing on edgeio

The first edgeio listing from China was posted today.

Here is a link to it:

First edgeio listing from China

Original Post

Pretty soon there were several more:


Anima Causa “适形椅”

This is really exciting for us. edgeio was built to provide for bottoms up publishing from every town and city on the earth. To have achieved 12,000 listings in 10 days, and to have listings from 1600 cities feels great. To see Chinese listings is awesome.

I also posted a fuller look at “instant listings” on my personal blog.

No tags, no ping server, no problem…

One thing we heard a lot of after launching was that publishing on edgeio is just too hard. You told us that requirements around tagging, ping servers, and claiming websites made it difficult for all but the savviest publishers to get their data into edgeio. We heard you and are happy to announce the launch of a new feature we call Instant Add.

Using Instant Add you can provide us with the URL of any RSS enabled website, well grab the most recent listings, and then you tell us if you want them published on edgeio. You can even add new tags to an item through this process. Give it a try. Just enter the URL of your website here. Of course, you can still publish on edgeio by tagging posts with the “listing” tag and notifying a ping server, but if you want to bypass all that then “Instant Add” was designed for you.

As always, if you have any comments or find any bugs (its been known to happen), send us a note at feedback@edgeio.com

A busy week at edgeio

I wanted to give a status report on our first week from a product development 
point of view. First, it’s been a busy first week at edgeio. Since launch, over 
5,000 items have been published from more than 1,400 cities. While this is great
 news, things did not go smoothly for many people who wanted their items 
listed. In the world of RSS, ping servers, tagging, and claiming blogs 
there are numerous quirks that we did not encounter during our beta
 tests. So, we have learned a lot. We are now addressing known issues as 
quickly as possible. While mostly under-the-covers, we’ve been launching updates 
to the edgeio service on almost a daily basis since and plan to continue that 
pace of improvement until publishing on edgeio is easy for everyone.

 In addition to fixing bugs, we are also trying to answer the question,
 “what if I don’t know how to tag and I am not sure if my website 
notifies a ping server?”. Stay tuned for the answer which should be
 coming within the week. If you have specific issues please send feedback to feedback@edgeio.com. We 
read everything and learn from it.

edgeio product plans discussed

edgeio has a number of product releases due to happen over the next 2 weeks or so. As we discussed in a couple of places, edgeio was launched with a set of features specifically designed for bloggers who are familiar with tagging, and with ping servers. Some have said (correctly) that this is too narrow an audience for a listings network. We think that the amount of discussion about edgeio has justified our early focus on this audience, but we are almost ready to roll out features for bloggers who are less familiar with the technology, and also for non-bloggers. CrunchNotes points to a podcast where Brian Oberkirck interviews Mike Arrington and they discuss some of these plans. They also discuss spam control. The podcast is here.

Where do we go from here?

About a year ago, Keith and Mike introduced me to the idea building a classified listings system around content generated by edge publishers. I had worked with Mike and Keith at RealNames and was intrigued by the idea of giving individuals and businesses the opportunity to list content using their own websites rather than ceding control to a centralized service. So, we began working on edgeio and my job became taking the initial ideas and turning them into concrete plans for a service. Since those initial conversations, we have put a lot of work into building the first release and crafting plans for the future.

In-between chasing down the inevitable bugs following a 1.0 release, I’ve read a lot of great posts about edgeio and it seems that most of them have to do with two key questions.

• How will edgeio handle spam?
• Is edgeio only for bloggers?

Spam is a very real issue that we have been thinking about since day one and our approach to spam is twofold. First, we want to leverage the edgeio community as much as possible to identify posts and publishers that are likely to be spam or otherwise inappropriate. We have seen this work well in other environments and hope we can create the same sense of community in edgeio. To facilitate this, expect to see more in the area of reputation including authentication of publisher’s identity, commenting on publishers and posts, and automated removal of suspect items from anonymous users.

Communities alone, however, cannot stop spam so our second approach to spam is more heavy handed. We intend to leverage filters similar to the Akismet approach, implicit white lists comprised of authenticated edgeio members, and blacklists to handle publishers who continuously abuse the system. We do not claim to have a bullet proof system and there will certainly be issues with spam in our future. We can only promise that we are continuously monitoring the data and doing our best to adapt to the influx of data.

The initial release of edgeio is obviously tailored to publishers who are familiar with the ins and outs of tagging and ping servers. After writing the FAQ, I realize that publishing content is not necessarily for the novice; however, we wanted to give publishers full control over their listings. So, going forward we are committed to extending the concept of using tags and other inline markup to control every facet of how an item is rendered and distributed through the edgeio network. With the exception of claiming your weblog, visiting edgeio will be an option for edge publishers, not a requirement.

At edgeio we do realize, however, that not everyone is familiar with tagging and ping servers. For this reason, in the coming weeks we will introduce tools that allow publishers to add their content to edgeio without anything more than an RSS / ATOM feed from their website. You will have to come to edgeio to make this happen, but we promise the process will be simple and pitfall free.

Sometime later, edgeio will introduce tools for publishers who do not have their own RSS / ATOM enabled website. This way, we will offer a range of solutions meeting the needs of everyone from experienced publishers to people without their own website. It will take some time to get there, but watch for updates on a regular basis. The edgeio team believes in rapid iterations that take into account customer feedback.

If you have comments about the design, missing features, etc. feel free to comment here or contact us at feedback@edgeio.com. As the volume of comments increases, you may find that we direct you back to this blog for more lengthy answers to common questions.

Developers and edgeio

A nice thing to see on day one. Developers figuring out cool things to do with edgeio. I spotted this post:

Use ZapTXT with Edgeio
The much anticipated Edgeio launched today. It’s an interesting service that allows anyone to publish content through their site.

The site constantly monitors RSS enabled sites and publishes posts with the “listing” tag. The posts are then organized by tags using the Edgeio taxonomy. The idea for sellers is that they can reach a broader audience without any additional effort. For buyers, the draw is that they can find items for sale regardless of geographic location and without checking multiple sites. According to Edgeio, they currently monitor 28,954,323 websites.

Sound interesting? I think it’s a great idea, but again, I don’t want to have to sift through any more data. This is where ZapTXT comes in. You can enter RSS for any Edgeio category and your keywords and get notified whenever there is a new post. And, of course, with ZapTXT Mobile Widget you’ll have access to your Edgeio alerts from your mobile phone. If Edgeio turns out to be as powerful as the hype says it’s going to be, ZapTXT is the perfect companion to harness all that data.

posted by eduard at 8:53 AM

You can go there directly to download it. It’s here!

I also noticed Jerome’s Keywords can be made to work with edgeio.

As far as developers are concerned there is a ton of information in the edgeio FAQ. A lot of publishers have asked about submitting feeds with geography information in the posts, or with time sensitive information like expiry time. It’s all here.

Finally, some people have asked about using PayPal on edgeio listings. It’s really as easy as including a PayPal “buy now” button on your blog post. When edgeio indexes your post we will include the button in edgeio. Hopefully Google Payments will be able to work in the future also.