edgeio Anounces Support for osCommerce

Earlier this week, Andrew Yasinsky implemented a plug-in for osCommerce that allows online stores to easily publish their listings to edgeio, Google Base, and Froogle. osCommerce is an Open Source based commerce system used by over 9,000 stores around the world and we have already seen a few of those stores submit listings to edgeio. We hope that this will be the first of many plug-ins and integration tools that make it easy for anyone, from an individual to a large business, to submit data to edgeio.

Job Openings at edgeio

edgeio is always on the lookout for talented individuals to join our team; however, there are two openings which have risen to the top of our priority list. If these sound like a good match for you, please email us at jobs@edgeio.com.

Ruby Engineer

We are looking for an experienced Ruby engineer to join our small, but growing team. You should have some professional experience in Ruby along with a strong background in one or more of the following: C++, Java, and PHP. Experience building large web based applications with MySQL, PHP, XSL and CSS is a plus.

Operations Engineer

We are looking for an experienced operations engineer to join our small, but growing team. You should have experience managing large web services running on a LAMP platform and a strong background in MySQL tuning. Responsibilities will include managing MySQL instances, developing monitoring and test applications and provisioning new equipment.

If you think your skill set is a match for either position and are interested in join a small fast paced team where everyone contributes on multiple levels, please let us know. We’re at jobs@edgeio.com.

edgeio announces support for YouTube, Google Video, Skype and PayPal!

We are announcing support for YouTube, Google Video, Skype and PayPal on edgeio. I have been having great fun playing with my new Sanyo Xacti HD-1 camera. The screen shot below shows an edgeio posting that contains a YouTube video (Google Video works also).

YouTube and edgeio with Skype and PayPal

The real listing is here.

As of today you can come and do this yourself on edgeio. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Make a movie of the item you are selling, or want.
2. Upload it to YouTube or Google Video.
3. Click on “Create Listing” on www.edgeio.com.
4. Past in the code for your YouTube or Google Video.
5. Add code snippets for PayPal or Skype or both.
6. Publish your edgeio listing.

Cool stuff if I say so myself :-).

We will build in more explicit support to pick videos from your YouTube uploads and to pick Skype or PayPal buttons in future versions of edgeio.

Have fun, can’t wait to see the results.

New edgeio features to be launched tonight

Later tonight we will be releasing a new version of the edgeio web site. It has a number of new features that we are really excited about. The new site should go live sometime after midnight Pacific time.

1. The ability to post an item for sale directly onto the edgeio web site. No blog needed. When you do this for the first time you will be asked to choose a login and password. On subsequent visits you will be able to post instantly. This is in effect giving you a listings blog hosted by edgeio. In the future we want to consistently add features to this blog platform. Some we already know about (the ability to skin your blog for example). Others we want to hear from you about. feedback@edgeio.com is the place to send product feature requests.

2. The ability to add posts from your blog to edgeio without tagging your posts in advance. To accomplish this simply put your URL in edgeio’s home page and click “get listings”. We will retrieve all recent posts from your blog and you can select which ones to add to edgeio.

3. Tagclouds for cities and for items. Click on the number of cities on the edgeio home page to see the most popular cities on edgeio. After 2 weeks we have around 1200 cities with listings. This grows by about 300 cities a week. We expect to be at 10,000 cities this year. To see category clouds just click on the “more” at the end of each category list on the home page.

4. Advice for power users about how to automate edgeio listings via their RSS feed. We decribe the “edgeio control language” or ECL. This is a means of using tags to tell edgeio a lot about your listing and helps ensure it is listed in the correct cities, and for the correct categories. Over time ECL will evolve into a rich control language for power listers. This is a link from the top of the new edgeio home page.
Rob Hof has written a piece on the new features. We will add more links here as they are published.

Other links:

Read/Write Web

SomeWhat Frank

Mashable

No tags, no ping server, no problem…

One thing we heard a lot of after launching was that publishing on edgeio is just too hard. You told us that requirements around tagging, ping servers, and claiming websites made it difficult for all but the savviest publishers to get their data into edgeio. We heard you and are happy to announce the launch of a new feature we call Instant Add.

Using Instant Add you can provide us with the URL of any RSS enabled website, well grab the most recent listings, and then you tell us if you want them published on edgeio. You can even add new tags to an item through this process. Give it a try. Just enter the URL of your website here. Of course, you can still publish on edgeio by tagging posts with the “listing” tag and notifying a ping server, but if you want to bypass all that then “Instant Add” was designed for you.

As always, if you have any comments or find any bugs (its been known to happen), send us a note at feedback@edgeio.com

Where do we go from here?

About a year ago, Keith and Mike introduced me to the idea building a classified listings system around content generated by edge publishers. I had worked with Mike and Keith at RealNames and was intrigued by the idea of giving individuals and businesses the opportunity to list content using their own websites rather than ceding control to a centralized service. So, we began working on edgeio and my job became taking the initial ideas and turning them into concrete plans for a service. Since those initial conversations, we have put a lot of work into building the first release and crafting plans for the future.

In-between chasing down the inevitable bugs following a 1.0 release, I’ve read a lot of great posts about edgeio and it seems that most of them have to do with two key questions.

• How will edgeio handle spam?
• Is edgeio only for bloggers?

Spam is a very real issue that we have been thinking about since day one and our approach to spam is twofold. First, we want to leverage the edgeio community as much as possible to identify posts and publishers that are likely to be spam or otherwise inappropriate. We have seen this work well in other environments and hope we can create the same sense of community in edgeio. To facilitate this, expect to see more in the area of reputation including authentication of publisher’s identity, commenting on publishers and posts, and automated removal of suspect items from anonymous users.

Communities alone, however, cannot stop spam so our second approach to spam is more heavy handed. We intend to leverage filters similar to the Akismet approach, implicit white lists comprised of authenticated edgeio members, and blacklists to handle publishers who continuously abuse the system. We do not claim to have a bullet proof system and there will certainly be issues with spam in our future. We can only promise that we are continuously monitoring the data and doing our best to adapt to the influx of data.

The initial release of edgeio is obviously tailored to publishers who are familiar with the ins and outs of tagging and ping servers. After writing the FAQ, I realize that publishing content is not necessarily for the novice; however, we wanted to give publishers full control over their listings. So, going forward we are committed to extending the concept of using tags and other inline markup to control every facet of how an item is rendered and distributed through the edgeio network. With the exception of claiming your weblog, visiting edgeio will be an option for edge publishers, not a requirement.

At edgeio we do realize, however, that not everyone is familiar with tagging and ping servers. For this reason, in the coming weeks we will introduce tools that allow publishers to add their content to edgeio without anything more than an RSS / ATOM feed from their website. You will have to come to edgeio to make this happen, but we promise the process will be simple and pitfall free.

Sometime later, edgeio will introduce tools for publishers who do not have their own RSS / ATOM enabled website. This way, we will offer a range of solutions meeting the needs of everyone from experienced publishers to people without their own website. It will take some time to get there, but watch for updates on a regular basis. The edgeio team believes in rapid iterations that take into account customer feedback.

If you have comments about the design, missing features, etc. feel free to comment here or contact us at feedback@edgeio.com. As the volume of comments increases, you may find that we direct you back to this blog for more lengthy answers to common questions.